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Cool Tool

Get a Grip

New Frings forceps offer superb ergonomics in the oral cavity—and will put a spring in your step (and your hand) all day long.

THE PORTMANTEAU—in which two or more words are mashed together to create an evocative new one—is a highly useful linguistic device. Spork and turducken were once our favorite examples thereof, but then we got a look at (and a feel for) Frings—a highly useful device of a different kind.

The name is a pileup of “forceps with springs,” you see, and they’re the latest in Integrated Dental Systems’ innovative line of INOX surgical instruments. They’re the first dental forceps with an internal spring-driven “auto-retractable” design. Any doctor who’s not a total fring—sorry, spring—chicken knows that means you won’t need an extra hand to assist with handle retraction, nor will you need to manipulate your fingers to open them. That promotes both ergonomic and surgical stability.

GOOD IN A PINCH: Master this exceptionally handy new device and your team will start calling you the Lord of the Frings.

Any doctor who’s not a total fring—sorry, spring—chicken knows you won’t need an extra hand to assist with handle retraction.

Any doctor who’s not a total fring—sorry, spring—chicken knows you won’t need an extra hand to assist with handle retraction.

Frings are available in more beak configurations—eight—than a nest full of egrets, and their German stainless-steel construction, two-tone titanium finish and faultless grip offer ideal handling in any clinical situation.

Also on offer from IDS are crown-removal frings, which are pliers equipped with the same internal mechanism. (Why they’re not called “crings” or “prings” will have to remain a mystery for dental-industry historians to ponder.) They’re gentle on ceramic and resin-veneered surfaces, for a lower risk of margin fracture or pinching of the tissue.

Reliable, beautifully designed equipment—what a concept! Some Frings, apparently, make all the difference. • idsimplants.com